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Home » HobbyFarms.com Forum Topics » Gardening and Crops » Why do radishes not form bulbs?


Why do radishes not form bulbs? Expand / Collapse
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Posted 7/13/2009 6:21:02 PM
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We have tried growing radishes for years. It's almost a given that we put in radish seeds. This year I found a radish where you eat the seed pods instead of the bulb part. We did plant some 'regular' radishes and this will be the last year. They are a cool weather crop, it's now turned hot and there are still no edible parts.!!!

Most years we get a few with no wormy parts - and we've moved them through out the garden. Mmm, just thought, I should try them in a different garden. The worms don't bother anything else, not sure why they pick the radishes.

That being said, any idea why there is nothing to eat?

Valerie
Enjoying life with chickens, bees, gardens, flowers and a dear sweet 3 year old fully of curiosity and love!
Post #9044
Posted 7/14/2009 10:09:24 PM
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VJ - are they not forming roots at all, or are they just really really small?  Sometimes if they are planted too thickly they won't fatten up properly.  Insufficient water can also prevent good roots from forming. 

Another thing that may be a problem, if you are planting a spring radish that really likes cool weather and it gets hot too fast, that will inhibit them.  Try a variety meant to withstand more heat like French Breakfast or Icicle.  Or, try planting winter varieties in mid to late summer - daikons work well planted like this.  You can always eat the radish greens, too.

When you say you are having trouble with worms, are you talking about root worms or worms on the greens?  I actually use radishes as a trap crop and pest deterrent around other veggies (especially squash and potatoes), but you could try to interplant your radishes with garlic, nasturtiums or marigolds if you are having a root maggot problem.

Post #9080
Posted 7/15/2009 12:16:35 PM
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Hello VJ. I have thought and thought and thought about this one until I got a headache. The only other person I know in the world that cannot grow radishes is my mother in law. The reason she cannot grow anything is, well she should have schooled at Hogwarts, if you get my meaning. I call her MILLY, she thinks it is because of the Mother In Law initials but in fact it is because of the adams family character Morticia, who liked to have dead flowers on display. She almost bankrupted the local nursery who, rather foolishly offered a full money back guarantee. She got banned from there.

Anyway check you are planting good seed of a known variety in soil and keep the soil damp, in 2 months you will have radishes. If you are not getting swollen roots something in the before mentioned sentance is wrong, my guess is the seeds are no good, go buy a new packet from somewhere different to where you got them before.

Post #9093
Posted 7/15/2009 3:06:30 PM


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How dry is has it been where you live?

Root crops need plenty of moisture falling from the sky in order to get a nice root crop. Of course too much water causes them to fungus and diseases too. I suspect its dry weather that is causing your issue though.

******

Tell a welfare recipient they must work and they call their congressman. Tell a farmer he can no longer work and he commits suicide. No wonder 1/2% of the population feeds the other 99-1/2%!!
Post #9098
Posted 7/15/2009 6:34:47 PM
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Thanks,
never thought of lack of moisture, and it has been very dry of late.

I generally have no trouble growing anything... so, I'll leave the 'Milly' thing to someone else... also, thanks for the tip on using radishes as a root crop.

Guess I'll give these little guys another try.

Valerie
Enjoying life with chickens, bees, gardens, flowers and a dear sweet 3 year old fully of curiosity and love!
Post #9100
Posted 7/16/2009 2:11:49 AM


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It makes a huge difference on root crops I'm afraid. One of the hardest commodities to grow commercially has to be potatoes (the root crop I am most familiar with). If its dry, they do not form a very good potato, and yet if you get too much water the darn things will either rot due to the wet conditions, or form a big potato.

You would think the latter would be great, but the potatoes here go for potato chips so they can't be too big or Lay's won't take them! Add in potato blight, insect damage and other issues and its easy to see that root crops can be difficult to raise.



******

Tell a welfare recipient they must work and they call their congressman. Tell a farmer he can no longer work and he commits suicide. No wonder 1/2% of the population feeds the other 99-1/2%!!
Post #9111
Posted 7/16/2009 11:46:49 AM
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I dont think so, with radishes the foliage will dry and die before you are anywhere near normal harvest time if there is not enough water. Assuming there is enough water to keep the plant alive but still in too short a supply the radish swollen root will form but it will go horribly fibrous and split and if you eat it the heat will blow your head off.

As VJ says the plant grows and she is experience in seeing healthy foliage then I think it must be the seed.

I suppose another reason could be a overdose of nitrogen, ie too much new manure close by??? or ammonia fertiliser???

I also think you should think of radishes to be closer to the brassica family than potatoes and the soil and weather conditions should be similar to such.

Tell us VJ, what is growing good or bad nearby and do you have success with swede and turnips and other brassicas? (cabbage, brussels, broccoli and or caulis)

One thing you could do to check the seeds is to plant half a dozen seeds in a small pot with a seed or potting compost and see if the root swells in 7 weeks or so.

Post #9129
Posted 7/16/2009 12:50:37 PM
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Lots of good tips - thanks.

We grow just about everything you can think of, including cabbage, turnips, carrots, lettuce, broccoli, etc etc

And we switch places every year so things aren't growing next to each other - good old crop rotation.

There might be something to the dry weather idea from DB. Last year we had a very dry August, even the flowers lost nectar. And we noticed that although we had lots of turnips they weren't very big, flavourful just not large.

This year we had a very cold spring so the garden got in late. After things started growing, it got warmer on some days but dry. Ah well, the rest of the garden is doing well and the chipmunks are definitely loving it. Love watching those guys.

Valerie
Enjoying life with chickens, bees, gardens, flowers and a dear sweet 3 year old fully of curiosity and love!
Post #9132
Posted 7/16/2009 4:23:47 PM


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I think its the drought.

Potatoes do as VJ describes but their leaves are nice and green since they get the benefit of moisture from the morning dew and a shot from photosynthesis. Down under the soil though...yep all they get is the water from the soil.

Here we have what they call potato soil, or gravely loam which helps drain the excess water, but loamy soil to help the root crop take. We can grow broccoli like the dickens...but carrots that seem to favor more loamy, no rock soil...we couldn't grow one six inches long I don't think.

******

Tell a welfare recipient they must work and they call their congressman. Tell a farmer he can no longer work and he commits suicide. No wonder 1/2% of the population feeds the other 99-1/2%!!
Post #9162
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