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Taking care of you? Expand / Collapse
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Posted 1/14/2009 1:55:37 PM


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Last Login: 6/3/2009 7:22:53 PM
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Happy New Year, everybody

I'm just curious, since the New Year is still fairly new, and some of you may actually still be sticking to your resolutions (unlike me!): what do you do to take care of yourself so you have the physical and mental energy to care for everybody and everything else -- family, animals, work, garden, etc.?

Here's what I'm trying to do to boost my energy, which seems to have hit rock-bottom lately (probably just the wintertime blues). Hmm, maybe by sharing this, I'll be more likely to stick with the plan:

1. Get some aerobic exercise (preferably outside) most days of the week, but don't stress about taking one or two days off. In winter, this usually consists of taking the dogs for a 3 to 4 mile fast walk with my friend and her dogs, or a walk/run, or -- if the weather is terrible -- working out on my indoor bike trainer.

2. Do strengthening and stretching exercises twice a week (back exercises daily). I've been having lower back problems recently, and the chiropractor gave me back/ab. exercises to do that really help -- if I do them, that is. For me, just lifting free weights a few times a week makes a big difference when I shovel manure, or lift sacks of grain.

3. Try to spend time on relaxation every day. This is a hard one for me, as I tend to be on the anxious side, but I'm trying to carve some time out to de-stress: maybe sit and read a good (non-work-related) book or do something creative and relaxing, like rughooking. I keep saying I'm going to start doing yoga or meditate, but I never seem to be able to. Oh! I did have my first-ever massage last week, on the recommendation of my chiropracter, and it was sooooo relaxing (plus it really helped my back). If you've never had one, I highly recommend it!

4. Get up earlier, go to sleep earlier. Lately, I've turned into a bit of a night owl, staying up way too late and having a hard time getting up in the morning. I think I actually get more done and feel more energized if I get up earlier and go to bed earlier, like farmers are supposed to do!

OK, now it's your turn

Cherie


Post #3551
Posted 1/15/2009 4:18:16 PM
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This is actually my down-time.    I have a very physical job, as well as looking after my own farm.  I work on a mink farm, the barns are 300' long with 14 rows, and I'm up and down them constantly.  On a regular day, I probably walk 3-4 miles.  Right now, we're just keeping the little weasels fed, as everything is too frozen to do anything else.  So, I only go in for two hours in the afternoon.  I get to sleep in until 7-7:30, do chores, have a leisurely breakfast and get some reading in.

I'm down to milking two goats, once a day, as well as keeping everyone fed and watered and bedded down in the cold.

We had puppies born on Tuesday, so spending lots of time enjoying them!  The noises they make are hilarious.

Post #3561
Posted 1/16/2009 7:03:07 AM
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Having had insomnia for most of my life, I find that a nap or a bit of down time nearly every afternoon is a must.

Winter is down time for me, too, as I paint houses for a living, in addition to keeping a huge garden and taking care of all of the animals on our farm.  I am happy to say that I am not quite the couch potato that I have been in the past and have only gained 5 pounds back this winter, as opposed to 15 or so normally.

I stack and move firewood (we have 3 different places it has to go before reaching the woodstove), clean up the barn twice a day, and do normal housework.

Karen

http://www.facebook.com/MrsKsCreations

Post #3568
Posted 1/24/2009 2:33:59 PM
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When I'm working around the farm and getting ready to do something and that little voice inside of me says something like "this or that might happen while you're doing this", I stop and regroup.  That little voice is all the things we've been taught over the years trying to keep us safe---listen to the voice!  Works for me.

Terry in Crab Orchard

Post #3691
Posted 1/24/2009 4:47:27 PM
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lack of sleep is one reason farming is not something to be taken lightly.  For example, in planting season, you will do your every day work and then do long hours wile you have a chance. If you farm long hours after your real job, then it's all the worse.  you do not have the option to just do it tomarrow. Weather and time are agenst you.

If you are not on the edge of your seat, you may get killed.
Post #3693
Posted 1/24/2009 8:51:35 PM


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[quote]oldfarmer (1/24/2009)
lack of sleep is one reason farming is not something to be taken lightly. For example, in planting season, you will do your every day work and then do long hours wile you have a chance. If you farm long hours after your real job, then it's all the worse. you do not have the option to just do it tomarrow. Weather and time are agenst you.

If you are not on the edge of your seat, you may get killed.[/quote]

You put that very well! I know when I'm really tired, or I let my mind wander (like to the next items on my mental to-do list) rather than pay attention to the here and now, that I make more mistakes when working around our animals. I've learned the hard way to always stay alert and in the moment around our horses -- been knocked into, stepped on, and nearly run over too many times!

Thanks everybody for sharing

Cherie

Post #3696
Posted 1/26/2009 6:58:30 AM
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Actualy it's been shown with study that many millitary wounds can be attributed to a lack of sleep.  Falling asleep at the wheel or making poor choices due to days with out sleep.
Post #3707
Posted 1/27/2009 6:49:47 AM
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I have been working extra hard.  I have had issues with my water and so I have been lugging buckets and buckets so my animals will have water.  The barn doesn't seem too far until there are huge buckets to lug.  I also had to move my horses as my goats were not safe with them any more.  So they are in a far field so farther still to walk with buckets.  I am hoping to get beautiful arms out of it.  I do however try to exercise everyday as well.  My mother bought my kids the Wii game system and she bought me the wii fit.  It actually works, there is yoga and strength training and balance games.  If your like me though it doesn't matter how much work there is when you can look outside and see the animals happily munching or lazing around working hard at doing nothing.
Post #3729
Posted 1/27/2009 8:17:49 AM
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I think it's the seasonal cycle.  As many of you probably here all summer long...visitors to my farm say "how do you do it all?" and it is pretty impressive what I (we) get done in a day all season long.  NOW that winter is here and I'm already for bed as soon as it's dark and by 7pm I really want to pass out I think "how in the world DO I get it all done in the summer?" (I am in the barn at 5am and finished with barn chores at 9pm everyday with cheese making and markets and gardens and guesthouse inbetween)  SO, I have learned to love the winters and my somewhat laziness and HOPE my energy comes back with the new season (so far so good!)
Post #3733
Posted 1/27/2009 12:25:20 PM
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Last Login: 2/12/2009 8:16:28 AM
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yes BZ. It's in the Bible.  As the world rests, so shall you rest.  when this time of year comes around, and the nights are longer...we as people were created to chill out and rest up for the time of year when the growing CAN be done.  Seeds have a dormant time, so do in kind does Man.

this is that time of year when projects are done that need a little extra time. You can, bit most do not want to rebuild a tractor or other equipment during the time of year when it is most often in use.  Who wants to take hay equipment apart for a small fix that could wait until, winter...even if it's raining the day you take that tool apart, you may need get into more work than you asked for and then the sun will come out. 

Now is the time to rebuild that tractor, or fix things inside that need fixing before planting time comes. It's also easyer to think projects out when you don't have crops to worry about.
Post #3735
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