HobbyFarms.com
LivestockCrops & GardeningTools & equipmentFood & Kitchenhome & barnmarketing & mgmtcrafts & nature
Hobby Farms Forums
Rules-Read First    Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On
Welcome Guest ( Login | Register )
        

Home » HobbyFarms.com Forum Topics » Livestock » Goats » Hoof Care


Hoof Care Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted 11/19/2013 9:48:58 AM
Advanced Member

Advanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 4/15/2014 2:35:47 PM
Posts: 3,332, Visits: 2,841
Is it really that easy or have the instruction left an important step out?

Any tips to share would be appricated.

Post #31005
Posted 11/21/2013 3:27:05 PM


Average Member

Average MemberAverage MemberAverage MemberAverage MemberAverage MemberAverage MemberAverage MemberAverage Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 4/14/2014 4:53:34 PM
Posts: 576, Visits: 978
It is really easy. I learned by watching a youtube video. My only warning is to be careful of their heel area. It is easy to cut that part too short. I made one of them bleed, (one hoof of 20 goats) and just put a bandage on it and it healed fine.

The trick is getting someone to hold them!

M. and D.
Post #31009
Posted 11/22/2013 6:12:45 AM
Advanced Member

Advanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 4/15/2014 2:35:47 PM
Posts: 3,332, Visits: 2,841
I bought a pair of hoofroot shears and I've been opening and closing them @ work so P2 dosen't see them (Christmas Gift). There's got to be a better pair that will closer easier out there. Any suggestions?

I picked him up a hoof pick/brush and looking at files. Any suggestions on the file?

If family is reading this P2 needs goat items for Christmas, so he won't be in the RED next year with his 4-H record book.

Post #31011
Posted 11/25/2013 7:28:43 AM
Starting Member

Starting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 3/6/2014 7:49:17 AM
Posts: 35, Visits: 71
We have found that giving the goat getting a trim some treats helps calm them down and distracts a little bit as well.

We used to have a big Boer buck that would stand perfectly still when he was getting a hoof trim, and would let us know if he got anything in his hooves by trying to show us the bottom of his hooves as soon as we came out to see him in the morning for a check-over and feedings.
Post #31019
Posted 11/27/2013 1:17:16 AM
Starting Member

Starting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 3/6/2014 7:49:17 AM
Posts: 35, Visits: 71
Also, we have found that normal hoof clippers are a bit big for smaller goat breeds (as well as you kids of any breed that we have had so far (Pygmy, Nigerian Dwarf, Alpine, Boer, Nubian).

We have found that a set of medium diagonal cutters and a set of toenail clippers has helped with the smaller goats, where the hoof clippers available at Tractor Supply end up being too large to make the trimming of goat hooves straight and even (and not too deep).
Post #31029
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »


Reading This Topic Expand / Collapse
Active Users: 2 (2 guests, 0 members, 0 anonymous members)
No members currently viewing this topic.
Forum Moderators: Admin, HFfriend, Community Moderator, Assistant Moderator

Permissions Expand / Collapse

All times are GMT -8:00, Time now is 6:10am

Home | Link to Us | Hobby Farms Related Links | Classified Ads | Community | Contact Us | About Us | Advertise With Us

ShopAnimalNetwork.com | Dogs | Cats | Birds | Horses | Fishes | Reptiles | Small Animals | Remember Our Pets

Disclaimer: The posts and threads recorded in our messageboards do not reflect the opinions of nor are endorsed by BowTie, Inc., Animal Network nor any of its employees. We are not responsible for the content of these posts and threads. Site best viewed with IE 5+

Copyright © BowTie, Inc. All rights reserved.
Our Privacy Policy has changed. Policy/Your California Privacy Rights. Terms of Use. Guidelines for Participation.