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Our first donkey.....have some questions. Expand / Collapse
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Posted 7/28/2013 12:18:50 PM
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We picked up a small Mediterranean donkey a few days ago to put with our two Scottish Highland heifer yearlings. According to the lady we got him from, he's around 2 years old. He's not gelded yet, but is very affectionate, calm, and will follow you around where ever you go.

He's obviously been worked with quite a bit, he let me pick up each of his feet to take a look at his hooves the first day we got him, and he didn't have a problem with it at all. He doesn't seem to mind our two dogs either....they will run into the field, and he will just walk up and sniff them, and then walk off.

I had a few questions about taking care of him.......

1. Do I need to worry about gelding him? He seems extremely calm, sweet, and non aggressive.

2. I've got a salt block out for him, but I've noticed that every now and then I'll see him licking on the 20% protein lick tub that I have out for the Highlands....will that hurt him at all?

3. How often do I need to have his hooves trimmed? And how do I know when it's time to get this done?

Thanks!!
Post #30631
Posted 7/28/2013 4:44:37 PM


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Gelding him would be a good idea, when we had our 3 in the spring they would get very rambunctious. You should be able to tell just by looking at the shape and size to tell when they need to be trimmed ours need to be done at least a couple times a year, one of ours would start to limp a little when his were getting too long and needed trimming.

As far as the protein block I have no idea we only had the 3 mini donkeys and a mini horse so only had the salt lick.

 Lord keep you arm around my shoulder & your hand over my mouth                                                              If God brings you to it, He will see you through it            'The will of God will never take you where the Grace of God will not protect you.'

Post #30635
Posted 7/29/2013 5:28:09 AM


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GET HIM GELDED! I learned real fast that a jack can change their personality in a heartbeat. We have the same type you have and raised him since he was 12 weeks old. He was raised with pygmy goats and bonded with them. After he turned a year old he began to change from the sweet loving pet to the donkey from hell. Not too bad at first and we thought it was just being playful but it got progressively rougher. He began chasing the goats and would sneek up behind us and start pushing us around. The final straw was when he grabbed a goat and threw her to the ground and tried to stomp her. Luckily, no injuries but it was a decision maker. Since he has been gelded he is the best guardian and pasture mate.
As far as upkeep, they are very easy keepers. We clean his hooves weekly and have our farrier trim them 2 to 3 times a year as needed. I do touch up occasionally but it usually isn't necessary. We keep a mineral/salt block in the pasture and mix loose minerals in the food once a week. Watch how much you feed him because they can put on weight fast. We give a small handful of feed and corn mixed each evening along with a double hand full of hay. He grazes all day so he really doesn't need much feed.

Ken


Deep in the South Carolina Lowcountry
Post #30638
Posted 7/29/2013 5:21:28 PM


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We have a female miniature Mediterranean donkey and she is a great guardian - but only for the ducks. She chases the goats unfortunately and just hasn't seemed to bond with them. One word of caution - typically donkeys do not like dogs at all! Both ours and the neighbors' try to stomp any strange animal that comes near them, including our cats and dogs. We keep ours in a pasture on the border of the property and she has done a great job of keeping out coyotes. She is very gentle to people, and will follow you around all over the pasture.

1. Do I need to worry about gelding him? He seems extremely calm, sweet, and non aggressive.

I agree with the others - get him gelded. When the hormones surge they can turn on a dime.



2. I've got a salt block out for him, but I've noticed that every now and then I'll see him licking on the 20% protein lick tub that I have out for the Highlands....will that hurt him at all?

Not sure, but since donkeys typically don't consume protein naturally, I wouldn't do it without checking with the vet. It may cause some health issues.

3. How often do I need to have his hooves trimmed? And how do I know when it's time to get this done?

3-4 times a year for us works just fine.

M. and D.
Post #30640
Posted 7/30/2013 7:24:34 AM
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Thanks for all of the information on the Donkey. I checked the label on the lick tub that I have for the cows, it’s an “all natural” 20% protein lick tub designs for Cattle, Horses, and other Equines. I don’t see him over at the tub much, just every now and then. The only reason I have it out for the cows is because the people we bought them from suggested it, but they raise their highlands for beef…we have them for pets as the most part, may try to breed them in a few years.

I will try to find a local Ferrier who knows donkeys, it would be nice to at least have someone check out his hooves and maybe a little trim if needed.

I’ll have to check with the local vet on getting him gelded. I’m assuming they will just band him?
Post #30644
Posted 7/30/2013 3:26:09 PM


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They don't band donkeys. Our vet came out and gave him a knock out needle, then cut out the "offending parts". Donkey was out about 45 minutes and the vet stood by to make sure he came around ok. Some vets will only give a local and the donkey/horse stands for the entire procedure but is out of it. Our vet preferred to knock them out to eliminate the possibility of a kick.

Ken

Deep in the South Carolina Lowcountry
Post #30645
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