HobbyFarms.com
LivestockCrops & GardeningTools & equipmentFood & Kitchenhome & barnmarketing & mgmtcrafts & nature
Hobby Farms Forums
Rules-Read First    Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On
Welcome Guest ( Login | Register )
        

Home » HobbyFarms.com Forum Topics » Hobby Farms Discussions » What do you recycle on your homestead?

12»»

What do you recycle on your homestead? Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted 11/12/2008 2:38:11 PM


Junior Member

Junior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 3/12/2014 6:21:20 AM
Posts: 186, Visits: 779
We're all into recycling these days. America Recycles Day reminds us where we are and what more we can do.

After you read the article on our home page, let us know what all you recycle on your homestead.

How have you gotten creative about recycling around the farm?

What tricks have you learned?

Tell us your recycling stories!



Hobby Farms, Hobby Farm Home and HobbyFarms.com are all on Facebook! Become our fan ... here's a link to the website page: www.facebook.com/pages/HobbyFarmscom/42353337183
Post #2844
Posted 11/13/2008 11:33:26 AM


Senior Member

Senior MemberSenior MemberSenior MemberSenior MemberSenior MemberSenior MemberSenior MemberSenior Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 12/14/2009 4:19:30 PM
Posts: 1,087, Visits: 1,748
If something has a recycling emblem on it, we recycle it. No discussion, that's simply how it is. It makes me cringe to see someone drop a plastic soda bottle or pop can in the trash. How can people do that? I can't help it--I pick them out and take them home to add to our recyclables.

And as for re-USING, I come from a long, long line of re-users! It's almost a game to see what I can make out of things other folks have thrown away. It's fun!

My mom says my grandma O'Connor used to be humiliated when Grandpa O'Connor came home from the county dump (there were dumps back then--these were the olden days) with at least as much stuff as he took to get rid of.

My mom was embarrassed that I almost totally dressed myself and my daughter in clothing from St.Vincent de Paul's and Goodwill Industries.

When I worked in the factories as a younger woman, I was the crazy lady who was always digging stuff out of the dumpsters and taking it home. Plastic pepperoncini barrels? They're great for storing grain! Carrot ends? My horses loved them!

My daughter caught the bug early (she loved buying cool things at the thrift stores and at yard sales) and when she lived on Ramstein Air Force base in Germany, she took re-using to new heights. When people were deployed from the base, they often threw good, useable appliances in the housing dumpsters. Robin would boost Moriah, my granddaughter in and Moriah flung the good stuff out. Then, Robin cleaned stuff up and distributed it to new folks on base who needed it.

She also participated in a German custom called "junking day". Whatever you wanted to get rid of but that still had some life left in it was placed on the curb one day each month. Anyone who wanted it could have it. Some of the older German furniture Robin salvaged while out junking is outstanding!

We need to engage in a lot more 'junking' than we do. The Germans who worked on the Air Force base repeatedly told Robin how wasteful most Americans are and I agree. We want the latest fashions, appliances, and gizmos and when they appear, out go the items we already had.

I don't know where this list originated but I keep it in my wallet and dig it out when I'm thinking of making a frivolous purchase. It helps--except, of course, when adding new faces to my animal family (everyone has a weakness, right?). :o/

Sue

Ask Yourself
 
-Do I need it?
-How many do I already have?
-How much will I use it?
-How long will it last?
-Could I borrow it from a friend or family member?
-Can I do without it?
-Am I able to clean, lubricate and/or maintain it myself?
-Am I willing to?
-Will I be able to repair it?
-Have I researched it to get the best quality for the best price?
-How will I dispose of it when I'm done using it?
-Are the resources that went into it renewable or non-renewable?
-Is it made or recycled materials, and is it recyclable?
-Is there anything that I already own that I could substitute for it?

Post #2851
Posted 12/20/2008 2:03:39 PM
Starting Member

Starting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 1/24/2009 7:37:45 PM
Posts: 2, Visits: 10
Hi to all. On my farm, we recycle Alumina cans, siding, car wheels,scrap iron, copper wire,tubing. I recycle used lumber, tin into sheds I need. I have people  call me all the time with used appliances they don't need, if they work I hang on to them for someone to use, if not they go on scrap iron pile. I get junk trucks and turn the beds into trailers to haul fire wood, the cabs go into the scrap iron pile,the next 100 lbs. to the next ton I always say. The most valuable thing I recycle is my manure to compost pile, then to my 3/4 acer garden. I also compost leaf mulch.
Post #3161
Posted 12/21/2008 12:04:20 PM


Junior Member

Junior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 6/3/2009 7:22:53 PM
Posts: 290, Visits: 321
[quote]Sue Weaver (11/13/2008)
If something has a recycling emblem on it, we recycle it. No discussion, that's simply how it is. It makes me cringe to see someone drop a plastic soda bottle or pop can in the trash. How can people do that? I can't help it--I pick themout and take them home to add to our recyclables.


Ask Yourself

-Do I need it?
-How many do I already have?
-How much will I use it?
-How long will it last?
-Could I borrow it from a friend or family member?
-Can I do without it?
-Am I able to clean, lubricate and/or maintain it myself?
-Am I willing to?
-Will I be able to repair it?
-Have I researched it to get the best quality for the best price?
-How will I dispose of it when I'm done using it?
-Are the resources that went into it renewable or non-renewable?
-Is it made or recycled materials, and is it recyclable?
-Is there anything that I already own that I could substitute for it?
[/quote]

I know this is a much-belated response, but I had to second Sue's cringing about people tossing recyclables in the garbage -- argh! We're lucky in our area: the county has made it pretty much a no-brainer by providing us with huge gray bins that we can toss almost all our recyclable stuff in except for glass and some plastics. We just throw the glass in a box and take it down separately. I keep some chipped but pretty bowls next to the kitchen sink to toss all my veggie scraps, coffee grounds, egg shells, tea bags, etc. in and throw it in our compost pile. A note on compost piles: you don't have to pamper them and turn them all the time if you don't have time. We just toss everything in the pile (and throw in leaves, old straw bedding, weeds in, too) and leave it for a long time -- it will take longer, but it does turn to compost.

I like that list, Sue. We try to reduce and reuse, too (I did my winter sweater shopping at Good Will a few weeks ago: they looked brand new!)...but I know we could do better.

Cherie
Post #3169
Posted 12/22/2008 5:44:34 AM
Senior Member

Senior MemberSenior MemberSenior MemberSenior MemberSenior MemberSenior MemberSenior MemberSenior Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 1/18/2013 7:28:50 PM
Posts: 1,188, Visits: 1,717
It would be easier to answer "What DON'T we recycle on our homestead?"

I guess what we mostly do is re-use, rather than recycle because very little goes in the recycling bin or the trash.  I even re-cycle my water.  For instance, when I am making a batch of yogurt, I put a gallon glass jar of milk in a pot of hot water on top of a "rack" I made from a coffee can lid by punching holes in it with a nail.  The hot water helps heat the milk quickly without allowing it to burn.  When the milk has reached 150-160 degrees, I take the jar out of the water and the water gets dumped into my Coleman personal cooler (which is also my yogurt incubator).  When the yogurt is done, the water is used to water my houseplants.  Not a drop wasted.

When I make soup, I skim off the fat and freeze it in a plastic container, so I can easily pop it out.  That goes in my suet feeder for the winter birds to enjoy.

Food here gets recycled to the pigs and the chickens when the humans are tired of the leftovers.  Our compost heap is really easy to manage - it is in the pig pen!  We built our pig pen last year over the compost heap.  When the pigs go, we move the compost to another area so it can age for a few months before going on the garden.  The pigs really enjoy everything that goes in the compost, including (MAJOR yuck here!) the manure from the cows and horses.

The cows, horses, pigs, and chickens all enjoy the grass clippings from when we mow our lawn.  You do have to make sure that they have free-choice hay and that they have eaten well of hay before giving them grass clippings, though, as horses and cows can get sick from pigging out on the short-cut grass.  When I weed my gardens, the weeds go in the pasture for the horses and cows to nibble.  They also like brush when trees and bushes get trimmed.

I always take a peek at the dump to see if there is anything useful we can bring home.  I found 2 hollow-core doors a few months ago.  One is on saw horses and is my table in my milking room.  The other is still awaiting a use.  We found a counter top that someone was throwing away - it is now my husband's shop table.  When we had our house sided 8 years ago we were given the leftovers from the job.  We used that on our pig shed roof - it keeps them nice and dry.  When we decided to keep pigs over the winter, too, we used leftover foamboard insulation to insulate the pig shed, but didn't want them chewing on it, so more of the leftover siding went over the foamboard.

I could go on, but will allow others to add their ideas.

Karen

http://www.facebook.com/MrsKsCreations

Post #3170
Posted 12/24/2008 9:10:45 AM
Junior Member

Junior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 4/25/2010 8:56:40 AM
Posts: 316, Visits: 521
All of my kitchen appliances were "recycled".  People give away almost new stuff, because they want the "latest" look.  I'll bet my stove wasn't even a year old.

DH is building a barn/garage from entirely recycled materials. He had to buy the used telephone poles, but the rest of the lumber was free.  Our chicken coop is a 21' travel trailer - a little rough shape for camping but perfect for chickens!  Ditto my "summer" milking parlour - it's a 15' camper.  I built a stanchion on one of the sleeping benches.  It's great because I can spray for flies, shut the door, and come back in half an hour to milk.  No more feet in the milk bucket.

We have a wood/oil furnace so all wood scraps get burnt.  Last year we heated the house all winter on broken skids from the feed mill and oil that people gave away - they switch over to natural gas, need to get the old oil tank out and quite often it's still half full.

I get plastic pails that used to hold cooking oil from the Chinese restaurant, and use those for watering animals.  The goats' mineral feeders are dog food hoppers that someone gave away.  (Dogs and cats couldn't figure them out when they still had a bit of dog food in them , but the goats figured them out within about 10 seconds!)  Goats get banana peels, chickens get vegetable and meat scraps, everything else goes to the compost pile.  Rabbits get pulled weeds in the summer.

I also shop at secondhand stores for clothing.  I started because I didn't want to pay full price for barn clothes, then discovered that there are usually some very nice things available!  Now I don't even go in retail clothing stores! 

DH and I will scan the curbside for anything useful on garbage days if we happen to be in the city.  I bought our dining room suite many years ago, but the rest of our living room and dining room furniture was given away - leather couches, curio cabinets. 

Our recycling gets picked up every second week, but we often don't have enough to put out, so maybe once a month.  Tin cans, plastic containers mostly.  If it wasn't for packaging, we wouldn't really need to put garbage out more than once a month either.

Post #3201
Posted 11/4/2009 1:10:16 PM
Advanced Member

Advanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 4/15/2014 2:35:47 PM
Posts: 3,332, Visits: 2,841
We found a man in the village that will buy our soda cans, so when we get a barrel of them I give him a ring.

P2 take the foil from the coffee and uses it to help dry his seeds.

I take shredded paper from the office and fill the rabbit's toilet with.

Dry rotted clothing gets cut up for rags in the kitchen or for staining.

The tubes that the minerals come in are used for every thing from fish tanks to chicken brooders.

Post #13016
Posted 11/4/2009 3:06:34 PM
New Member

New MemberNew MemberNew MemberNew MemberNew MemberNew MemberNew MemberNew Member

Group: Banned Members
Last Login: 11/15/2009 9:03:36 PM
Posts: 86, Visits: 84
I don't

I leaned that it takes more energy to recycle goods that to just toss them out. Many things are reused for other things on the farm. paper sacks for fire starters or old oil to lube gutter chains ect

however as to all the seperating things drive'n some place to do stuff with them and all the extra gas and energy that goes into all this, it's clear that we use more fuel than if we'd just picked up things that break down, burn or can be used for other things with out the extra cost.

Scrap I collect and give to the farm next door as they sell it for there taxes.

Post #13022
Posted 11/4/2009 9:23:34 PM


Average Member

Average MemberAverage MemberAverage MemberAverage MemberAverage MemberAverage MemberAverage MemberAverage Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 12/14/2013 11:34:55 AM
Posts: 968, Visits: 3,639
Grassclippings, weeds from the gardens, old bread & veggie scraps go first to the chickens, turkeys, & ducks then the remainder goes in the compost bin. Coffee grounds (filters & all), egg shells, and any none meat or dairy food scraps get tossed in the composting bucket I keep in the kitchen for the compost bin. All the shavings & manure when we clean the coop also goes in the compost bin.

I get 5 gallon pickle buckets from work that are used for hauling water in the winter to fill the pool for the ducks & fill the water dishes. They are also used for storing bird seed in. We have 3 metal trashcans that I picked up free at a yardsale camping one weekend that we use to store all our grain & scrtch feed in.

None of my furniture is new all was free or very inexpensive used, my appliances were all bought new but from a warehouse resaler - he buys up discontinued or left over last yrs models and resells at a huge discount over what the big box stores get - my french door fridge with bottom freezer & top of the line gas stove were both bought for half the price that just the fridge alone sells for at HD. The 3 carpets in my livingroom & kitchen came from a freecycler.

When we're done with something that still has life left in it I freecycle and if there isn't any life left hubby hauls it to the scrapyard when he has a full load and sells it for gas money.

99% of our clothes come from Goodwill or Salvation Army.

Most of the lumber used for the inside of our home was salvaged and the chicken coop was also salvaged  lumber, used metal siding, and wooden pallets.

My sister & I are avid junkers when we see something we know we need or can find a use for. My lawnswing, a glider rocker in my livingroom, my gas grill, outside lights, a few interior lights, and medicine cabinet all came from dumpster diving. The gas grill is all stainless steel & cast iron iside & out with a little elbow grease & a new ignigtor it looks as good as when it was new (this was a top of the line $2500 grill when who ever owned it first bought it)

Tonight we went & picked up a 5 drawer rolling cart that I received thru freecycle that was full of electric plugs, switches, staples, and covers that we need for a repair/remodel sis, BIL, hubby & I are working on. And in one drawer I found 3 wrought iron plant hangers that retail around here for just under $20 each, and the best part about that is they're almost identical to some that Sis has been drooling over everytime we have to go to the hardware store :-) When were done I'll offer up the left overs on freecycle and put the cart to good use for storing other small things.

All plastic,glass, metal cans, paper & cardboard go out to the crubside for recyling. One week it's paper the next it's comingled containers. A lot of the time trash only goes out to curbside every 2 weeks because we don't have enough to fill a bag in a week (we're on a pay per bag system so we definately don't waste by putting out a half full bag)

 Lord keep you arm around my shoulder & your hand over my mouth                                                              If God brings you to it, He will see you through it            'The will of God will never take you where the Grace of God will not protect you.'

Post #13035
Posted 11/5/2009 2:24:40 AM


Advanced Member

Advanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 9/23/2010 4:13:39 PM
Posts: 2,222, Visits: 2,136
I do a lot of recycling as well. It just makes sense too, but I agree that most American's are indeed wasteful. I mean look at some of the people that will kill someone and then just throw them in a dumpster...they honestly believe that once it hits the dumpster...it just goes away. No it doesn't!!

Here in Maine we are lucky because almost every can or bottle used for consumption is redeemable for redemption. That extra 5 cents adds up and cleans up our roads since people pick up these cans, return them and make money on the deal. When I was in MN it pained me to throw an empty can of soda in the trash, but that was common practice there. I just couldn't believe (then or now) that every state does not have a bottle redemption bill.

As for recycling, yes I do that with everything as well. Maine has a pretty good recycling system for such a rural state and just yesterday I took some cans, newspaper, cardboard, plastic, etc to the recycling place right here in town. Or I could have put it out curbside because that is an option too.

Farm wise, I even try to recycle the fence wire I get to control the sheep. I do a lot of temp fencing, and while it is a pain, I go to great lengths to reuse the wire and insulators. On the dairy farms they use shredded paper as a bedding material for the stalls the cows sleep and relax in. And of course copper, aluminum and scrap iron are also recycled which is lucrative and buys more wire, more insulators and more sheep...

We even go one step further and use the ash that comes out of the biomass boilers located around the state and at the papermills. This ash is a lime substitute so it gets recycled onto the soil and ups the PH level. I am also looking at a kelp product used by a company that makes gelatin (jello type stuff) as a lime substitute. Of course the cow manure gets recycled back into the fields where the feed came from, and next year I should have a composting pad on-farm to capture all the sheep manure. My dad wants to start a little greenhouse/truck farm enterprise and so the sheep will contribute to that in the form of recycling.

Heck I will go so far as to say I am not sure we could even farm today without some of the recycling products we use. I honestly do not think we could farm without recycling.



******

Tell a welfare recipient they must work and they call their congressman. Tell a farmer he can no longer work and he commits suicide. No wonder 1/2% of the population feeds the other 99-1/2%!!
Post #13036
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

12»»

Reading This Topic Expand / Collapse
Active Users: 1 (1 guest, 0 members, 0 anonymous members)
No members currently viewing this topic.
Forum Moderators: Admin, HRSEGRL, HFfriend, Community Moderator, Assistant Moderator

Permissions Expand / Collapse

All times are GMT -8:00, Time now is 7:44am

Home | Link to Us | Hobby Farms Related Links | Classified Ads | Community | Contact Us | About Us | Advertise With Us

ShopAnimalNetwork.com | Dogs | Cats | Birds | Horses | Fishes | Reptiles | Small Animals | Remember Our Pets

Disclaimer: The posts and threads recorded in our messageboards do not reflect the opinions of nor are endorsed by BowTie, Inc., Animal Network nor any of its employees. We are not responsible for the content of these posts and threads. Site best viewed with IE 5+

Copyright © BowTie, Inc. All rights reserved.
Our Privacy Policy has changed. Policy/Your California Privacy Rights. Terms of Use. Guidelines for Participation.