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Home » HobbyFarms.com Forum Topics » Livestock » Chickens and Poultry » Chicken Leg problems with Cornish X Rock...


Chicken Leg problems with Cornish X Rock... Expand / Collapse
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Posted 4/13/2011 4:41:27 AM
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I ordered some chicks a month ago but they earliest we could get them was this week. Well that wasn't fast enough for my little 8 year old daughter whose all new friends had baby chicks. So we went to TSC and bought 5 Cornish X Rocks chicks. They are now almost 4 weeks old and was actually going to move them to the coop this weekend.

The problem is I noticed one of the birds is having a problem with its leg. It can put some weight on it and still get around its just bent at a different angle, it's not straight up and down anymore.

What do I do? Should I go ahead and try to put it out in the coop this weekend hoping with more room to move that it will be okay or should we butcher it? It's big in my opinion but definately not big enough to be full size.

I let them have free food for the 1st week and then for the remaining time I filled the feeder full in the morning and once they ran out I took the feeder out until the next morning.

Did I do everything right? This is my first time with chicks, I would like it to grow a little more but I don't want it to suffer either.

Any advice would be helpful, This is my first "farm" problem.

Thanks
julie

learning to live a simpler life

www.ourtnadventure.blogspot.com

Post #25900
Posted 4/13/2011 5:04:21 AM


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Since it is a butcher chicken, I would go ahead and butcher it.  Just my opinion. I had one that had a limp and it didn't get up one day when I fed, in the morning, but by the evening it was dead. The other chickens started picking on it and not sure if it just died or they killed it, but was missing feathers and was 1/2 buried in the shavings.

That is about the age mine "went" bad I had just moved them out to the barn.

Livin to learn

Post #25901
Posted 4/13/2011 8:10:25 AM
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Like J said they are butchering chickens and they grow fast and some are ready as soon as 8 wks of age. The above broiler has a broken leg and it want heal on it's own and by the time it heals then it time to dispatch anyhow. If they go over the age that they are suppose to be dispatched at, then you have to put them on a diet and even after that you will see breathing problems as well as legs problems and some may even die of a heart attach and if you have any hens they will have to much fat around the egg production site that you want get an egg like the other breeds give.
Post #25904
Posted 4/13/2011 8:12:07 AM
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J or MrsKK aren't these design to be full grown at 10 wks of age?

We learned the hard way, when I purchase "Rhode Island Reds" and at 8 weeks of age I found out that they were red broilers. 

Post #25905
Posted 4/13/2011 6:14:35 PM


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I believe the cornish cross are 56 days so roughly almost 2 months.

Livin to learn
Post #25912
Posted 4/15/2011 7:50:47 AM
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The commercial cross strain is a mess, they have a number of common issues attributed to them including leg issues, breathing problems, and of course the inability to even mate.

Personally I have no interest in doing anything with them :P I can't really picture whats wrong so without seeing it if you want to save the bird I would think you could try putting a brace on its leg but the rate they develop it could already be to late or pointless.

I agree with the others, put it on the table.

Visit the Cameron Family Farm at: http://www.cameronfamilyfarm.com/
Post #25918
Posted 4/16/2011 7:15:40 AM


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Commerical Cornish X have been bred to produce high amounts of breast meat extremely fast and effiencently.  This causes a lot of issues that can mostly be controled by proper management.  It is extremely important to manage their feed so that they do not get too large before their legs develop.  You did a good job with the once a day feeding, but it sounds like yours may have not had enough protein early on.  It is recomended that you use at least 22% for the four weeks.  I have heard of a lot of people feeding gamebird/turkey starter at 28% for the first week or two. 

Check out the Meat ETC section of the  Backyad Chickens forum.  It has lots of good information on growing our Cornish X and other slower growing breeds from people doing 10 to 25 in their backyard to people processing and selling several thousand a year.

http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewforum.php?id=21

Properly fed Cornish X can mature to adults and breed naturally, but a fast growing meat ration plan won't do it.

Paul Ewing

Shining Moon Farm - Boyd, TX

http://www.ShiningMoonFarm.com

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