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need info for goat enclosures Expand / Collapse
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Posted 1/20/2011 6:59:49 AM
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I do not have goats yet, but would like to get a couple pygmy or nigerian dwarf goats in the spring. I'm looking for pictures or ideas on what kind of enclosure to put up. I'm not going to breed them. Will I still need separate stalls? Is concrete floor better? Do you all store you hay in the same enclosure you house them in? Any tips would be great. Thanks!!

Christina

Post #24626
Posted 1/20/2011 8:04:42 AM
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goat shelters are made out of a lot of items, depending on what you got on hand

google "port-a-hut"

some use pallets, plywood (untreated), cattle panels w/ t-post and a tarp

How cold are your nights?

Post #24627
Posted 1/20/2011 10:47:04 AM
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Thanks for asking this, I to do not have any yet but am planning on getting 2 Nigerian Dwarf goats soon. I will be using a shed we have and converting it into a barn. Inside there will be one pen/room for them. I will also store my hay and supplies in either the loft or another room within the barn. I am always open to other ideas though.

Our soon to be Property. Red "Cabin" is getting turned into a barn for a couple Goats, Chickens, and possibly meat Rabbits.  ---Apyl

Post #24628
Posted 1/25/2011 4:20:05 PM
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my goat stable is a ten by ten lean two shed that i built out of cedar logs that i used for posts and 2x4s to tie them together and i sheated it all with steal siding it faces south to let the sun in during the day and block the north winds i bedded it with straw and it keeps my goat dry thats the main thing they need to be able to stay dry
Post #24738
Posted 1/26/2011 9:45:11 AM
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Goat housing is a great topic. Basically you want to keep them dry and block the wind in the colder months, short of that there are no rules. Some inexpensive ideas are straw bales, simply build a box, put some 2x4's or scrap lumber over the top and stack some more. This is cheap and SUPER well insulated for the winter months. I've used a cattle panel with a tarp and ground stakes, simply bent into a U shape for a portable shelter in the summer. Another idea if you have a shed available is to simply put a lean to off of the side and store the hay in the shed. We have a simple enclosure that used to be a chicken coop by the previous owners that's 4x8 and tall enough to stand in, it's a simple pole style shed with dirt floor, all 4 of our goats use it with some straw thrown on the floor. Honestly I wouldn't go to any great expense and I wouldn't dedicate one of my sheds to my goats, but a simple 2x4 and tin lean to would make an ideal house and in winter months just stack a few straw bales in the direction necessary to block the prevailing winds.
Post #24746
Posted 1/26/2011 6:32:00 PM


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Our winds during the winter change direction rather consistantly, so how do you determine which direction to put the back of the shelter if using a 3 sided shelter? We end up with a lot of blowing snow so any opening would at some point get filled with snow.. any ideas?

Livin to learn
Post #24757
Posted 1/27/2011 6:55:54 AM
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Rule of thumb is that the north and west side need to be solid, sure you can add windows, just keep them closed during winter. The west side is to help with the shade once the sun comes over at lunch time. The north side to be solid because of the cold weather or when the jet stream comes down. However you need to know you land about which side should stay open the south or east. For us a lot of our shelter are open on the east side due to them being in wooded fields and we get a lot of rain from the south. But then again this is Louisiana...LOL
Post #24763
Posted 1/27/2011 7:36:40 AM


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Where ever a goat pen goes will be in open area unless I build up against the chicken coop! and even then it would have to be on an open side...

It is starting to get nice, so was going to let the chickens out into their yard, but can't get into the yard to open their door! snow has blown in and there is no way to open their door from the inside.. need to do some remodeling this spring!

Livin to learn

Post #24765
Posted 1/27/2011 5:30:28 PM


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Pygmies and Nigerians don't like the really cold weather or getting wet so they will need an enclosed structure to protect them from the cold wind and rain. I built a simple frame shed with plywood sides and metal roof. It doesn't need to be very large (depending on how many goats you will have) Mine is 8'x12' and is plenty for four pygmies and a mini donkey. It has a dirt floor and loads of straw in the winter so they can create beds to keep warm. Their feed buckets and hay mangers are in there and out of the weather. For just goats, large dog houses will also work fine, just put in some straw for warmth.

Ken

Deep in the South Carolina Lowcountry

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