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When is my cow going to have her calf? Expand / Collapse
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Posted 11/24/2010 5:51:56 PM
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Well, we have her (RUBY)in the barn again, as she HAS to be close.  We had her in 3 weeks ago, when we thought she was close, but she jumped out and ran down the fence line trying to find a place to get back in the pasture with her buddies.  She had a calf last January in -15 degree weather, that died of hypothermia.  I am still sick over it.  It is starting to get too cold again, and I want to make sure she is inside this time.  She licks at her sides alot.  I'm hoping it is tonight.  We have it set up so she can come in and out of the barn, while also being able to go out to a small paddock to see her buddies across the fence.  She seems to want to be outside more than inside the bard.  I have a camera to view her, but she always seems to find the spot where I can't see her!  Any SURE signs that she is ready, other than seeing feet???

2 dogs, 7 chickens, 5 horses, 5 cats, 7 Longhorns, with 1 one the way, one boyfriend
Post #23762
Posted 11/25/2010 10:19:31 AM
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I know the kind of misery you are experiencing, as our cow just finally calved on Saturday, two days after her due date.  I'm assuming that your cow was field bred, so you are unsure of her due date.

My guess is that she bagged up suddenly and her vulva started swelling about three weeks ago, making you think she was really close.  My cow always does that just about three weeks ahead of time - this year she was four weeks ahead of schedule.

For the last week and a half, hubby and I visited the barn every few hours and I even set the clock to get up at 3am to check on her a couple of times, sure that she was just about ready to go.

The only way I knew for sure that she was ready to go was that she would lie down, then a few moments later she would get up and start pacing around.  Back down again, then back to the pacing.  I saw her have a couple of contractions about 2 1/2 hours before she calved.

It was very cold here when the calf finally came, about 20 degrees actual temperature with high winds that brought the wind chill to about 0.  We were fortunate, though, that the freezing rain didn't start until the next day.

I'm hoping the best for you for a safe, healthy delivery.  Let us know what happens.

Karen

http://www.facebook.com/MrsKsCreations

Post #23763
Posted 11/28/2010 4:06:02 PM
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We have goats that can kid any day so we know how annoying and scarey it is waiting for the babies. But look for a pasty white discharge. If it appears and is long and she is bagged up big then that's her plug and she's within 24 hours of calving. the problem is that some cows have discharge all the time making it difficult to really tell. But you just have to watch and wait. Good luck!

There are two types of people:Those who can walk away from the farm and those who cannot. Those who can walk away should not walk but run to a much easier lifestyle.
Post #23803
Posted 11/29/2010 2:48:14 PM


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Whenever we thought one of our cows were ready to calve.. we were wrong. Ours did not lay down and then get back up or anything.  There was one I saw acting funny from the house with binoculars, hubby was at the quonset.. I called him and he said we'd go check her as I was on the phone with him, her water broke.. by the time I walked out to near the pasture the cows were in.. she dropped her calf.. Our first calf born was a month early and one morning, I just looked out and there it was walking along with its mom... We were lucky and had no calving problems. Learned quickly that they will calve when they are ready... no matter what the calendar says.

Livin to learn
Post #23819
Posted 11/29/2010 7:34:46 PM
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...no matter what the calendar says....

And no matter what the cow has done in the past, as I've learned this year!

Karen

http://www.facebook.com/MrsKsCreations

Post #23823
Posted 11/30/2010 1:08:12 PM


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Is this a beef or dairy cow?
It's a little easier to tell with our jerseys b/c of their thinner frame, but here's the signs we look for:
- the area on either side of her tail head will fill out because the baby is "dropping" or entering the birth canal - whereas before it was sunken in from the baby being lower in the belly area.
- their udder may or may not swell and might even leak colostrum
- they lick their sides alot and lay down then stand up again over and over as if they can't get comfortable.
- she'll probably have the calf outside if you don't lock her up in the barn. As long as her paddock is fairly clean, it's ok. Our cows will leave the nice "clean" barn with fresh sawdust in it to go have their calves out in what they feel is "cleaner" grass.

I fully believe that what doesn't kill you only makes you stronger. I believe in dirt and germs!
Post #23835
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