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Make money breeding animals? Expand / Collapse
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Posted 4/8/2006 10:56:30 PM
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Hello,

I've always been fascinated by genetics and pedigree research, but I know in dogs, if you do it right, you don't make money. Only the puppy mills and disreputable breeders make money.

I'd be interested in the possibility of other animals, but I don't know them too well. Which animals can you actually make money from breeding? I sound like a puppy miller, I know, but I really am interested in the details of breeding quality stock, and was curious what other options are out there. Even the most fabulous breeders need to pay the bills.

A hobby farm is a dream of mine, but won't happen for a couple years, anyway. I'd appreciate any feedback on this regard.

Jessica
Post #202
Posted 4/22/2006 9:23:37 PM
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The next great livestock is goats and particularly for meat. There are many reasons why but suffice it to say that an investment in high quality meat goats such as Boers should put you at the forefront of this new industry. Goatworld.com has a menu pulldown that shows ethnic holidays where goat meat is eaten. It is huge and growing daily. We bred champion Shetland Sheepdogs for years and the money is probably better than livestock but I would suggest goats as the best livestock. It is the same routine, you must show and establish a name before you will get clients who want to use your bloodlines for breeding.
Post #203
Posted 4/23/2006 1:42:12 PM
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I suppose horses. I mean, if you have good bloodlines and they're trained well...That's really the only thing: they have to be trained; not many people buy un-trained horses.

Also most any animal that can be sold for meat, like goats...

I hope you find what you like!

TUPPENCE
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TUPPENCE
23 Month Old Connemara Cross
My Pride and Joy

Proud 2nd place winner of the 4/9/06 YR Member of the Week contest. Congrats, GOG
Proud winner of the cutest picture class in the Almost Summer Break Horse Show 2006
Proud to be in the Equine Love Clique
Proud Member of the Three Days, Three Ways Clique
Proud member of the Arabian Lovers Clique
The Best of Both Worlds: Morab Lovers Clique
Proud founder of the Future Horse Authors Clique
Proud Member Of The Gray Horses Clique
Proud Member of the Hunter Fashions Clique
|><||==|Riding Instructor in Jump 4 Life Clique|==||><|
Proud member of the ~Horse Addiction Clique~
If you and your horse rock out to any type of rock weither it be AC/DC or Chevelle, put this in your siggy!!
Pics of my horses and stuff at: http://photobucket.com/albums/h202/almostfamous1286/
Post #204
Posted 11/1/2007 12:13:24 AM


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Care should be exercised in breeding animals for profit, so that the emphasis in marketing is on the end use of the animal - other than as future breeding stock.

We have six rescued llamas on our farm, and could have a great deal more if there were room, as a result of the llamas-for-profit campaign that took place in the 1990's.

Very similar to what is happening today with alpacas, the interest was in breeding, and selling breeding stock to others to begin breeding operations. Who is buying other than breeders? The market eventually becomes saturated, and the animals suffer. Llamas live 18-25 years, and are excellent trail companions for packing, livestock guardians, can produce exquisite fiber, pull carts, and be used as therapy animals. Had these traits been marketed as heavily as profit in breeding, there might still be a market today. Instead, there are sanctuaries and rescue organizations.

Raising animals is rewarding in more ways than financial, and yet we must be able to profit from the venture, but not to the detriment of the animals we raise. A good breeder leaves the animal better off, not just genetically, but situationally as well.

Your pointed question shows your concern, we're wishing you the best in your venture.

You are always welcome!

Promised Land Family Farm

Post #837
Posted 11/24/2007 12:01:30 PM


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I agree Goats are the way to go!!!

I own 3 boer [meat goats], and am slowly breeding them into my 10 goat herd. Now, if you decide to go into the goat buisness, GET MEAT GOATS!! I've been selling Dairy Goats for 4 years and Finally decided to get into Meat goats.

Meat goats do alot better than Dairy goats:

1. Meat goats do alot better in cold weather.

2. They gain better.

3. they're cute!

4. Everybody wants to eat 'em!

I've got a neighbor that sold His Boer buck for $1,200!!

I'm waiting for my Nubian does to kid in March 2008.[They're bred to a Boer meat goat]

meat goats usually are from $350-$800.-i'd say the most Normal prices.

Meat goats are the WAY to go!!!

See my goats at:

www.freewebs.com/sarahsboergoats

Post #868
Posted 11/24/2007 12:12:05 PM


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Here are a few examples of my BOER meat goats:

This is my buck.

this is my Boer doe. See how they're so big.

Milk Goats are great too. I just prefer Meat goats.

I would say Horses would be great because I LOVE HORSES! But they are a whole lot more work, eat a lot more, and the demand for horses has gone down.-At least that's what people tell me[But I myself have a desire to have a nice trail horse!

I used my Milk goats to raise a calf. I would milk the goat, put the milk in the bottle and then feed it to the calf. It's alot cheaper than buying milk replacer, besides milk replacer isn't as good for 'em!!

See my goats at:

www.freewebs.com/sarahsboergoats

Post #869
Posted 12/28/2007 5:30:54 PM
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I started raising alpacas about five years ago. We started out with two as pets, loved them and started selling them. They are easy animals to care for. The hardest thing about them might be doing the monthly worming if you decide to use injections and trimming toenails. Shearing is usually done by professional shearers that come through the states in the spring and go to area farms that you bring them too untill you get enough alpacas for them to come to your farm. We have had interest in people wanting to breed them to sell and using them as fiber animals to sell fiber and make yarn and clothing from their fiber and use them as pets. Contact me if you have any questions about alpacas.

Christa Wissler

Wissler Alpaca Farm

www.alpacanation.cpm/wisslerfarm.asp

www.alpacalove.blogspot.com

Wissler Alpaca Farm
Warrenton, MO just west of St. Louis
www.alpacalove.blogspot.com

Post #926
Posted 1/28/2008 8:43:58 AM
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I've been around horses most of my life, and have been raising gaited Rocky Mountain horses since 2001.  Let me tell you, from the time you put into these guys, even with the prices you can get for some of these guys, it's almost impossible to make a good profit. 

I'm down to a herd of 11 horses right now, down from 20 a few years ago, and do all of the feeding, lots of the vet work, all of the riding and training.  Many people out there want a good, solid riding horse, and that takes lots of TIME to create.  We've always had a hard time selling the younger stock.  Now, I'm just breeding a couple of mares every other year, to improve my herd.  I have a hard time making a profit (as my husband says, the way you make a million dollars in the horse business is to start with two!!).  I love horses, which is why I'm in the business, but if I had to make a "real" living at it, I couldn't afford to do it.  One of the biggest places I lose money is the fact that I really take care of preventative care:  I worm the horses every two month, have the farrier trim/shoe every two months, give vaccines every year, and have the vet come out to float teeth every year.  On top of this, you have the occasional big vet expense (horses getting kicked or cut up), or breeding expenses (we only AI our mares....easier than keeping a stallion around).

So, anyone who thinks they're gonna make big bucks in the horse business is misguided. 

I'd suggest cattle or sheep.... at least people want to eat the meat!  =)

Take care!



: Raising smooth gaited Rocky Mountain Horses in Cedaredge, CO.
www.geocities.com/stonehedgefarms

Post #973
Posted 2/10/2008 12:13:41 AM
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If you are going to be a breeder of any kind of animal, you have to first like the animals and enjoy the work (and yes, it is a lot of work, no matter what animal).  :)  Farmers who don't make much money keep farming because they love farming, it is (or should be) the same with raising animals.

We raise beef cattle and quarter horses (and a few paint horses).  We make a profit at the end of the year, but we aren't close to being rich.  We raise them because we like them, and we make our programs work so we come out in the black at the end of the year.

Keep your inputs low.  If you want to raise a grazing animal, you will save a LOT of money having lots of good pasture.  Trucking in hay gets expensive fast.  Learn how to do basic vet care and maintenance yourself.  Some vaccinations can only be administered by a vet, but for livestock other vacc's can be bought/given by the owner.  Start with GREAT seed stock.  We have very few horses that ever need a dental float because they genetically have great mouths and don't need it.  Same with the hooves, horses with excellent hooves don't have a lot of problems like tenderness/abscess/splitting, etc.

You have to decide what type of animal you want to raise, and who your customers will be, and then figure out from there how you can make it work.

Dream Big.

Post #1002
Posted 2/18/2008 5:42:02 AM


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We raise miniature horses and American Shetland ponies and crosses.

No matter what kind of animal you breed you have to love it. It is not a hobby it is a way of life! Find an animal you love and start researching. Breeding any animal can be both exhilirating and heart breaking.

Some years we make money and some we dont. But we also re invest everything we make back into our horses and facilities.

There is a way to raise animals with ethics and morals but it is the harder road. But in my opinion well worth it. In any kind of animal breeding reputation is everything.

You can view my sites at www.baxterspaintedpasture.com and www.americanshetlandpony.com

Go with what you love and are passionate about

Kay

visit us today at http://www.americanshetlandpony.com or http://www.baxterspaintedpasture.com
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