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Pasteurization Expand / Collapse
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Posted 3/7/2010 2:09:46 PM
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We have now got our own goat milk, thanks to our beautiful does. I have pasteurized the milk using a double boiler, because that is what is suggested. The goat book I am reading says I should not heat the milk in the microwave to pasteurize, but doesn't say why? Does anyone know why I shouldn't pasteurize in the microwave?
Post #17081
Posted 3/7/2010 5:29:12 PM


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This is 100% a guess, but I would think that it is because a microwave does not heat evenly.

???????

******

Tell a welfare recipient they must work and they call their congressman. Tell a farmer he can no longer work and he commits suicide. No wonder 1/2% of the population feeds the other 99-1/2%!!
Post #17083
Posted 3/7/2010 10:32:40 PM


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DB is right about the uneven heating of liquids.  You can easily super heat it and when you remove it from the microwave it explodes all over scalding you if it hits flesh.

Paul Ewing

Shining Moon Farm - Boyd, TX

http://www.ShiningMoonFarm.com

Post #17087
Posted 3/8/2010 6:35:35 AM
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I don't know why your book says you cant use a microwave but I do know I would use one to pasteurize milk.
I cannot remember the pasteurizing temperature, I think it is 78 deg C but I am not sure.
The trick I guess with a microwave is actually keeping it at that temp for whatever time is required.

Personally I would experiment, use a set volume of milk and find what time in the Microwave brings it to the temp and further experiment temp against time after reaching temp. Then I would use the same volume and time again and again.

A lot of books think the home producers have unlimited money to go and buy equipment that often sponsor publication of the books.

Saying all that I am assuming you are using the milk at home, If you are selling it I would bet some government organization will want to help you spend money buying all sorts of stuff, including worthless paperwork.
Post #17092
Posted 3/8/2010 9:49:03 AM
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For home use I recommend all natural, raw natural. I strongly suggest this book...
The Untold Story of Milk: Green Pastures, Contented Cows and Raw Dairy Foods
By Ron Schmid, ND

It can explain it much better than I could ever try to do.
Post #17103
Posted 3/9/2010 2:10:40 PM
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This is the first time milking for me. My family took one look at my milk in the pail and insisted I pasteurize it. I had stuff floating in it. I am getting much better at keeping it out though. I do need to read up more on raw milk. I kind of think the push against pasteurizing in the microwave was the uneven heating. The problem is it takes so long to heat up in a double boiler over the stove. I thought I could do some laundry while waiting. I think I made condensed milk or something, because it was sweet and thick. Nothing like the raw milk.
Post #17148
Posted 3/9/2010 8:48:08 PM
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Why are pasteurizing goat milk? You don't have to do that just keep it clean while milking. Put a clean cloth over the bucket while milking and then restrain before you put in ref.good luck goat milk is good for you
Post #17169
Posted 3/10/2010 5:58:25 AM
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Yes, I agree with 3mtd, improve your milking technique and your milking cleanliness and drink the milk the same day as milking, keep it refrigerated in the meantime.

For starters, clean the undercarriage of the goat, clean your arms and hands, wear a clean lint free apron and collect the milk in a clean bucket through a sieve or cloth screen.

Make sure the bucket is cleaned everyday, even use a few drops of bleach in the cleaning water (then rinse).
Post #17174
Posted 3/10/2010 9:28:43 AM
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What are the best products to use in the cleaning process? What do you use on the does udder? You mentioned a couple drops of bleach in cleaning the bucket. My cousin has done some milking and has mentioned milk filters that he bought from some where?
Post #17190
Posted 3/10/2010 7:57:02 PM
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I am getting less stuff in the bucket. At least the goats are not stepping in it anymore. I think my family has to just get used to the idea. We were funny about our own chicken eggs at first too. Now we hate store bought ones. I have a lot to learn about milking still. The first two weeks, we had to carry the goats to the milking stand, and they are big girls. Now they can't wait to be milked.
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